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Training Log Archive: Swampfox

In the 1 days ending Jan 6:


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Friday Jan 6 #

Note

Just heard on the radio that the National Weather Service is reporting it went down to -40F here in Laramie last night, the 5th coldest reading in over 50 years, with the other 4 readings coming in 1962 and 1963, While of course that's what first comes to mind to most people when you ask them about 1963, a small percentage of people will also mention that as being the year The Beatles released their albums "Please Please Me" and "With the Beatles" which featured songs like "Lordy It's 39 Below", "Baby Why You So Cold To Me", Give Me All Your Wind and Make It Cold", and of course the English folk traditional "Four Dog Night."

Note

I drove up top again today to assess conditions, feeling a little bit perhaps like Moses with the great flood.

Once I got up top, I sat in my truck for a while, watching snow swirl across the parking lot. It looked cold, even though it was completely sunny. Then I got out and just stood by my truck for a few moments, and it didn't seem so cold. The next step was to walk for a minute or two, so I walked over to the warming hut and stood inside. The walk didn't feel bad. Then I saw a skier coming down the trail, finishing up, and they were skating. Not fast, but they were moving okay. You can often look at someone and tell if they're really cold or not, and this skier looked fine. Okay, then!

I walked back to my truck, grabbed my skis, and headed out. My feet got a little cold, but otherwise I was fine. And considering the wax I had on and the temperature and fresh snow, I was surprised I had any glide at all. I ended up skating for 85 minutes, and didn't see another skier until the last 3 minutes of it.

When I got back home it was -9F in Laramie, but I really don't think it was anywhere near that cold up top. If it had been that cold, I should have had zero glide given what I had on my skis.

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